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An Appraisal of the Life of Charles Thomas Jackson as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

      Abstract

      Charles Thomas Jackson claimed to have original ideas that led to the creation of guncotton, the electromagnetic telegraph, and the use of ether as an anesthetic. There was, though, a gap between when the idea was enunciated and when it became reality, with other individuals accomplishing the latter. An examination of Charles Jackson's life reveals a pattern of behavior that is compatible with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder with an associated diagnosis of oppositional defiant disorder. These diagnoses are explored in the context of Jackson's life to explain why he did not carry his initial thoughts to fruition.
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