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From “Use of Anaesthetics” to “Mens Sana”

  • Lei Tian
    Affiliations
    Resident, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
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  • George S. Bause
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: 5247 Wilson Mills Rd, No. 282, Cleveland, OH 44143-3016.
    Affiliations
    Resident, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA

    Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine, 2124 Cornell Rd, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA

    Honorary Curator, American Society of Anesthesiologists' Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, 1061 American Lane, Schaumburg, IL 60173-4973, USA
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Published:January 11, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janh.2016.01.003
      On gazing at the image “Mens Sana,” which was initially published in 1912 in London's Vanity Fair Magazine, one may not initially notice the shadow of phrenology behind the caricature of Sir George Savage.

      “RAY”. “Mens Sana” (Sir George Henry Savage, M.D., F.R.C.R.). Vanity Fair (London, UK) Supplement, Men of the Day No. 1317. February 7, 1912.

      Dressed very sharply in a tidy professional suit, Savage is depicted clenching his left hand authoritatively into a fist at his side. His other hand is reaching into his right pocket, either to present or to hide something. The cartoon's title, “Mens Sana,” means a “sound mind,” and this portrayal is likely a positive one, as Vanity Fair was saluting Savage as a “Man of the Day” for garnering a knighthood in 1912. (See Figure.)
      Figure thumbnail gr1
      Figure“Mens Sana”: (Sir George Henry Savage, MD, FRCR) drawn in 1912 by political cartoonist “RAY.”
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      References

      1. “RAY”. “Mens Sana” (Sir George Henry Savage, M.D., F.R.C.R.). Vanity Fair (London, UK) Supplement, Men of the Day No. 1317. February 7, 1912.

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