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From Danielsville to Doctor's Day: Crawford W. Long, MD, the First Surgical and First Obstetric Etherist

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Dr. Kowalczyk's current position: Obstetric Anesthesiology Fellow, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr., H3580, Stanford, CA 94305–5640.
    ,
    Author Footnotes
    2 This author reports no financial disclosures.
    John J. Kowalczyk
    Footnotes
    1 Dr. Kowalczyk's current position: Obstetric Anesthesiology Fellow, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr., H3580, Stanford, CA 94305–5640.
    2 This author reports no financial disclosures.
    Affiliations
    Resident, Anesthesiology & Perioperative Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
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  • Author Footnotes
    2 This author reports no financial disclosures.
    George S. Bause
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: 5247 Wilson Mills Rd, No. 282, Cleveland, OH, 44143-3016, USA. Tel.: +1 440 725 0785; fax: +1 888 734 6342.
    Footnotes
    2 This author reports no financial disclosures.
    Affiliations
    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA

    Clinical Associate Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine, 2124 Cornell Rd, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA

    Honorary Curator, American Society of Anesthesiologists' Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, 1061 American Lane, Schaumburg, IL, 60173-4973, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Dr. Kowalczyk's current position: Obstetric Anesthesiology Fellow, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Dr., H3580, Stanford, CA 94305–5640.
    2 This author reports no financial disclosures.
Published:August 15, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janh.2016.06.005
      Crawford W. Long was born on November 1, 1815, in the small town of Danielsville, Georgia. He graduated from Danielsville Academy and then received his Master of Arts degree from what would become the University of Georgia before returning home to serve as the Principal of Danielsville Academy. After a year at that position, he left his hometown on horseback to begin his medical training at Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky. After 3 years there he transferred to the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, where he first witnessed the use of nitrous oxide and ether. Both agents were used recreationally at the time, but his observations of friends with bruises that they could not remember would change the course of medicine.
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