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Precarious Distraction and Carious Extraction: Nitrous Oxide during the “Second World Billiards Tournament”

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Neither author has any intellectual, ethical, or financial conflicts of interest.
    Sheng-chieh Chang
    Footnotes
    1 Neither author has any intellectual, ethical, or financial conflicts of interest.
    Affiliations
    Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Neither author has any intellectual, ethical, or financial conflicts of interest.
    George S. Bause
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: 5247 Wilson Mills Rd., No. 282, Cleveland, OH, 44143-3016.
    Footnotes
    1 Neither author has any intellectual, ethical, or financial conflicts of interest.
    Affiliations
    Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA

    Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine, 2124 Cornell Rd., Cleveland, OH 44106, USA

    Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia, Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, American Society of Anesthesiologists, 1061 American Lane, Schaumburg, IL 60173-4973, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Neither author has any intellectual, ethical, or financial conflicts of interest.
Published:September 29, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janh.2017.09.004

      Highlights

      • In 1864 GQ Colton moved his Colton Dental Association to Manhattan's Cooper Institute.
      • In 1879 Brunswick & Balke sponsored a World Billiards Tournament at Cooper Institute.
      • Tournament Manager FC Newhall's tooth was extracted under nitrous oxide from Colton.

      Abstract

      During the 1879 Brunswick & Balke World Billiards Tournament, Manager FC Newhall had a tooth extracted under nitrous oxide administered by GQ Colton. The dental extraction occurred at the tournament site, New York City's Cooper Institute.

      Keywords

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      References

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        • Hirsch N.P.
        Gardner Quincy Colton: pioneer of nitrous oxide anesthesia.
        Anesth Analg. 1991; 72: 382-391
        • Bause G.S.
        The 2016 Lewis H. Wright Memorial Lecture: America's doctor anaesthetists (1862-1936)—turning a tide of asphyxiating waves.
        J Anesth Hist. 2017; 3: 12-18https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janh.2016.12.001
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        Laughing gas at Brunswick & Balke's 1879 World Billiards Tournament.
        Anesthesiology. 2017; 127: 422https://doi.org/10.1097/ALN.0000000000001819
      1. The coming cue contest. Sexton withdraws. Arrangements for the champion billiard tournament completed—meeting of the players.
        in: New York Times. January 19, 1879: 7
        • J.M. Brunswick & Balke Company
        Antique tables. Nonpareil. From the 1878 J.M. Brunswick & Balke Co. Illustrated Price List.
        (Available at:)
      2. The cue battle begun. Opening of the billiard tournament. Albert Garnier and Jacob Schaefer cross cues—a game that was at times brilliant, at others poor—Sexton debarred from challenging for the championship cup.
        in: New York Times. January 21, 1879: 5
      3. Slosson beaten at last. Maurice Daly's biggest run. Yesterday's contests in the billiard tournament—Daly beats Slosson and Schaefer defeats Gallagher.
        in: New York Times. January 31, 1879: 5
      4. “H G.” Friday's cues and caroms; Schaefer's effort to beat Slosser's run and average.
        in: The Sun [New York, NY]. February 1, 1879: 1